A Short Review of Who Killed Willie Earle?

This review originally appeared on International Baptist Theological Centre, Amsterdam, Community Blog. IBTSC is an internationally focused ‘baptist’ research and higher education institution with an intentionally European perspective focused on the issues of baptist identity, missiology and practical theology. Check out their website for full details of study programms and extensive library facilities – www.ibts.eu .  Their staff and students come from many cultural backgrounds and ethnic groupings throughout Europe, the Middle East and beyond. You can read the original review here. Continue reading

Pastoral Care Worthy of the Name

 

willie_earle_coverDuring February Abingdon Press will publish my, Who Lynched Earle?  Preaching to Confront Racism.  The book is a “labor of love,” a tragedy that has captured my imagination over a lifetime, a topic that has been one of my major concerns. 

Who Lynched Earle? opens with a lynching in my hometown when I was one year old.  After the lynching, a young Methodist preacher, Hawley Lynn, preached a courageous, historic sermon to his all white congregation in the South Carolina town where the lynching occurred.  I move from a narrative of that great sermon to an appeal to white preachers like me to preach to their mostly white congregations about the sin of racism. 

We are having a day-long conference with scholars, bishops, and students at Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C. on February 17 (seventieth anniversary of the lynching of Willie Earle) to talk about the book and its concerns. 

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Sin: A Look at Who Lynched Willie Earle?

During February Abingdon Press will publish my, Who Lynched Earle?  Preaching to Confront Racism.  The book is a “labor of love,” a tragedy that has captured my imagination over a lifetime, a topic that has been one of my major concerns. 

Who Lynched Earle? opens with a lynching in my hometown when I was one year old.  After the lynching, a young Methodist preacher, Hawley Lynn, preached a courageous, historic sermon to his all white congregation in the South Carolina town where the lynching occurred.  I move from a narrative of that great sermon to an appeal to white preachers like me to preach to their mostly white congregations about the sin of racism. 

We are having a day-long conference with scholars, bishops, and students at Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C. on February 17 (seventieth anniversary of the lynching of Willie Earle) to talk about the book and its concerns.  Continue reading

Peculiarly Christian Talk about Race

willie_earle_cover

Who Lynched Earle?  Preaching to Confront Racism is to be published in late February. 

Who Lynched Earle? opens with a lynching in my hometown when I was one year old.  After the lynching, a young Methodist preacher, Hawley Lynn, preached a courageous, historic sermon to his all white congregation in a little South Carolina town.  I move from a narrative of that great sermon to an appeal to white preachers like me to preach to their mostly white congregations about the sin of racism. 

We are having a day with scholars, bishops, and students at Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C. on February 17 (seventieth anniversary of the lynching of Willie Earle) to talk about the book and its concerns. Continue reading

A Prayer for Monday

Lord Jesus, our true Sovereign, we give thanks for Egypt. Even though the rulers of Egypt were not expecting a Jewish Messiah, they did not turn your Holy Family away and welcomed them when they fled King Herod’s wrath.​ Welcoming Savior of the nations, we give thanks that your Holy Family received the Magi from the East, welcoming their gifts. We give thanks that the Magi risked crossing many borders to get to the babe of Bethlehem, and there to be the first to worship him, even though they had neither the language nor the scriptures as their guide. Thank you for emboldening the Magi to disobey cruel Herod’s executive order.

​Gracious Christ, we give thanks that in your earthly ministry you never turned anybody away, not even us, in our sin. We praise you for emboldening others to cross our borders in order to give us the good news that we were included in your salvation, even though our ways and our language were foreign to the gospel.  

​Forgive us when we sinned against Matthew 28:19, stayed comfortably at home, refused your order to immigrate into all the world, making disciples in your name.

​Especially this day we pray for your work in the hearts and minds of the agents of Homeland Security, Border Control officers, and U. S. Customs personnel, particularly those who are trying to follow you. Give them the courage to be not only obedient to the government that pays them but also faithful to the Savior who gave his life for them and the whole world. Enable them to be kind. Put in their minds Acts 5:29, and give them courage to do speak up and to do right in this dark hour.

​Forgive government officials who order others to do wrong, who perform cruel acts against others under the guise of service to their country. And forgive us for giving power to those who promise us false security and safety, giving them the authority that belongs only to you.

​We confess that we have limited the expanse of your Kingdom to our merely human borders. We have been content to narrow the scope of your church to people who look like us. We admit that we have regarded people who speak other languages, who practice other faiths, and dwell in other nations as threats rather than as your cherished children, our sisters and brothers in Christ.

​Lord who is gracious to the suffering, the homeless, and the persecuted, to those who must leave the places they love and venture forth like the Holy Family, be gracious unto us, even in our sin against your expansive salvation.

​Soften hardened hearts. Go ahead and judge us and chastise us as you will. Force us to live up to our convictions and to welcome others as you have welcomed us.

Please, dear Lord, save our leaders (whom we elected) from following the way of Herod. Amen.

Racism: A Peculiarly American Sin

willie_earle_cover

During February Abingdon Press will publish my, Who Lynched Earle?  Preaching to Confront Racism.  The book is a “labor of love,” a tragedy that has captured my imagination over a lifetime, a topic that has been one of my major concerns. 

Who Lynched Earle? opens with a lynching in my hometown when I was one year old.  After the lynching, a young Methodist preacher, Hawley Lynn, preached a courageous, historic sermon to his all white congregation in the South Carolina town where the lynching occurred.  I move from a narrative of that great sermon to an appeal to white preachers like me to preach to their mostly white congregations about the sin of racism. 

We are having a day-long conference with scholars, bishops, and students at Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C. on February 17 (seventieth anniversary of the lynching of Willie Earle) to talk about the book and its concerns. 

 For the next few weeks, I’ll be running excerpts from Who Lynched Earle?

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